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anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and the demonstrated power of nonviolence and claims for participation in american citizenship and rights, why at this moment in the late 60's to the black panther party challenge america as an empire? way this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to the revolution and the black panther party? and so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we have developed in the book to give you a taste of some of it here. the first thing is that one of the things i was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is in the mid-60's there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and d
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
his civil rights movement to a human rights movement. meaningful equality was not to be achieved through civil rights alone without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great a
by recalling lifelong support the civil rights movement also opined the brief was legally correct. jay stanley pottinger the assistant attorney general for civil rights argued strenuously against filing. he made three points. the brief is incoherent. no one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only
during the civil rights movement. at 10:00 p.m. eastern, our weekly "after words" program. david bernstein sits down with a a special guest. he concludes nights programming at 11:00 p.m. eastern with sandra day o'connor in her book out of order. stories from the history of the supreme court. as a booktv.org for more information on this weekend television schedule. >> you are watching booktv on c-span2. coming up next, fiona deans hallora recounts the life of thomas nast. a regular contributor to harvard weekly, he made the donkey and the elephant the symbols of the the political parties in our country. this is about 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good evening. welcome to the historical society. i want to thank you for joining us tonight. what i know will be a very interesting program. "thomas nast." he is the father of political cartoons. i want to thank you for being here. this is the first time in a while that we have had the ability to start an evening program. i appreciate you coming in and bring with us. our mission is to preserve and tell the history and culture.
that if we did we would be treated okayed liked that and wanted to be a civil rights lawyer that that's what i wanted to do from the time i was 6-years-old, i'm sorry, the sixth grade. and i knew i was going to law school and by the time i went, i got interested in criminal law. before that i never thought of, wall and my professor made of the class interesting and i thought of pursuing that and i ended up that wasn't so much later on a think that the work of public defenders we are fighting some civil rights of our clients and given the disparity of the criminal-justice system, the racial disparity. i went to harvard law school and howard university undergrad. you have a very famous name. a few times i've gotten invitations from cuba but she is an incredible wollman myett meijer triet >> host: you met her? >> guest: i've never met her. i want to meet her. i get a lot of e-mails and that kind of communication with her. she now is doing a lot of important work on the present industrial contact creates more confusion >> host: we have been talking with defense the power of the american prosecut
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
. in 1968, dr. king told advocates the time had come to transition from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. many photo-quality could not be achieved through civil rights allowed without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to quality education. civil rights are empty promise. in honor of dr. king and all those who labor to win the election crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a group that for jobs, not jails. is limited and we limited analytical discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights to work, shelter and two food. what a sweet deal? first we've got to begin by telling the church, the wiltshire. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a catholic system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the center places of worship, behind artist and inventor center. we got to be willing to tell the truth so great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can c
the civil rights movement. at 10 p.m. eastern we'll bring you our weekly "after words" program. this week david burstein, author of "fast future" sits down with host s.e. cupp. and we conclude tonight's prime time programming at 11 eastern with sandra day o'connor. her book is "out of order." visit booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week. bioethicist ezekiel emanuel recounts his upprescriptioning and how his immigrant parents produced three successful children including his brother rahm emanuel and ari emanuel, a hollywood agent, in "brothers emanuel." in "those angry days: roose svelte, lindbergh and america's fight over world war ii, lynne olson recounts world war ii. jeff chu presents his thoughts on religion and gay rights in "does jesus really love me: a gay christian's pilgrimage in search of god in america." in "forecast: what physics, meetology and science can teach us," mark buchanan explains how the ebb and flow of markets and the economy can relate to numerous fields of science. look for these
of the brave. they discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia festival of the book. tonight at 8:00 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> up next on booktv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very
their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia test festival of the book tonight at k58 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> here's a look at books being published this week. and youngest siblings a hollywood agent in "brothers emanuel "a memoir of an american family. in the angry days roosevelt, lindberg, and america's fight over world war ii recounting the political battle between american isolationist and interventionist during world war ii. jeff chu articles editor for fast company magazine present the thoughts on religious and gay rights.
historic civil rights legislation the income tax cut in just six weeks after the assassination of president kennedy mix to 80 dead and threatened and praised and did what a hands-on leader does and his hands were huge and the stories about johnson grabbing people by the shoulder and just getting right in their grill to make them realize a one part and it was. how about my dad and the managing of the fall of the iron curtain as the soviet empire was collapsing there were significant dangers that there would be violence of epic proportions to be the the united states could have justifiably done a victory dance over the soviets, particularly for example when the berlin wall fell. i will never forget watching my dad on tv and critics, the pundits were saying he should go over there and celebrate with the german people. had my dad done with the people of this year and now wanted to do rather than being a leader would have created greater fall more abilities for gorbachev to create an orderly transfer without will blood shed. amazingly so. a dictatorship of epic proportions in the 20th century fe
-- is keeping the draft some of the civil-rights movement and people were briefly joining martin mr. king was assassinated april of 68 and just after i graduated kennedy was assassinated that had a huge impact on me. instead as the good quality of law in london if you could write fast and giveback accurately you did well but in a harvard they would change the goalpost and that was interesting because it encouraged sinking but most of all but struck me which was so different from the ireland i have left was young people making a difference favor deciding we could make a change and use things and we are going to bring on our own perspective so i came back to ireland in 1968 to practice and teach lot and as mine has been to be said i was in view was something he recognized as harvard humility. that led me the following year to question why it was those who were traditionally elected to the six universities scenes with elderly male professors, why was that? my friend said if you do want to go forward we will campaign with you. i was elected to the senate at the age of 25 that means i was prac
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)